Daniel Lourenço

E-mail: d.lourenco@campus.ul.pt

Daniel Lourenço has a BA degree in Languages, Literatures and Cultures: Comparative Arts and Cultures, from the University of Lisbon, and an MA degree in Sexual Dissidence in Literature and Culture, from the University of Sussex. He collaborated with the research project CILM – City and (In)security in Literature and Media, as the recipient of an FCT grant for undergraduate integration into a research project (2007-2008) and as an external collaborator (2009-2012).

He was admitted into the PhD-COMP programme in 2015/2016, as a funded doctoral student (PB/BD/113725/2015). He carries out research on the work of the 20th century experimental North American feminist author Kathy Acker, implementing various kinds of dissident critical prisms onto her work, including radical trans, queer and feminist theories, anti-colonialist politics and ethics, hermeneutics grounded on biopoetics and biopolitics, feminist epistemologies, and other modes of critical practice which challenge the representational and political boundaries of Acker’s work and its critical reception in 20th and 21st century literary milieus. I particularly underline the need to engage with a critique which avoids over-romanticizing Acker, trying to explore some of her more ambiguous, opaque, or problematic representational choices in political and ethical terms, via an analysis duely grounded on practices of close reading and an acknowledgement of Acker’s relation to 20th century experimental poetics and the western literary canon. He works under the supervision of professors Susana Araújo (University of Lisbon) and Georgina Colby (University of Westminster).

He is a member in training of the Centre for Comparative Studies (University of Lisbon), where he is a part of the team of the project CILM – City and (In)security in Literature and Media. He is also a poet, with two poetry pamphlets published and another upcoming volume.

Publications:

  1. Queer na primeira pessoa: notas por uma enunciação localizada“. Estudos Feministas, volume 25, no. 2.